What does the black spot represent in the lottery?

Who gets the black dot in the lottery?

Bill ‘s wife, Tessie, draws the black dot. She protests that the drawing wasn ‘t fair even as her neighbors begin stoning her to death (“The Lottery Summary” 1). In “The Lottery”, Shirley Jackson uses various symbols, themes, and irony to develop the well-known short story.

What is a symbolism in the lottery?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel. The lottery has been taking place in the village for as long as anyone can remember.

What are 3 symbols in the lottery?

The Lottery Symbols

  • Stones. The stones that the villagers use to kill the victim selected by the lottery are mentioned periodically throughout the story. …
  • The Black Box. …
  • The marked slip of paper.

What is the moral of the story of lottery?

The moral of the story is that simply because something has always been done does not mean that it is beneficial and should be continued. One key theme of “The Lottery” is the danger of tradition and blindly following along. … They don’t quite recall how the lottery started.

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What does Tessie symbolize in the lottery?

Tessie is symbolic of the scapegoat in “The Lottery,” which is sacrificed in ritual atonement for the sins of the tribe. However, she is also an average member of the tribe who sees nothing wrong with the system until she is selected.

What Is the lottery a metaphor for?

The condition of the box—worn-out, faded, stained, and splintered—is a metaphor for the lottery itself, a ritual that has long outlived its usefulness and become worn and obsolete. Although Mr. Summers talks about making a new box, nobody in the village wants to do so.

What is the lottery an allegory of?

Shirley Jackson’s story “The Lottery” serves as an allegory regarding humankinds inherent to be cruel and society’s ability to inure to violence. The author’s use of a third-person dramatic narrative combined with strong themes, symbols and irony clearly supports the lesson Jackson was trying to portray.